Wyoming name change for transgender people

Disclaimer: This is legal talk, not legal advice. Laws vary by state, and some of the information discussed on this page may not be applicable in your case. I cannot guarantee the accuracy of this information and provide it without warranty. Laws change and this information may contain errors and omissions. It is up to you to confirm any information herein by doing your own research.

In January 2004 a reader sent the following:

The steps for changing name and gender in Wyoming are similar but must be done separately.

To officially change your name:

Make an application to the District Court at the County Court Building.

This is most easily done by asking the Clerk of Court for a copy of a prior change of name filing. Most of the Clerks have these on open file and they are available for a one-dollar copy fee. A few offices require that you have a specific court docket number before they will make you a copy. If this is the case in your county, go to the local newspaper office and ask to see the last notification for name change published by them. The notice will have the District Court number listed in the text. Take this number back to the Clerk of Court and get a copy of that filing. Use a word processor to set up a similar filing document substituting the name your present name and the name you have chosen to use. Print out a hard copy.

Present the printed copy to the Clerk with a cash payment of sixty dollars to have your turn on the District Court scheduled and a court docket number assigned.

With the number in hand, return to the newspaper office and purchase the required four-week public notice of your intention to change your name. This costs about forty dollars in Sublette County or two hundred dollars in Sweetwater County. The difference is due to the circulation size of your local newspaper.

Take the receipt for the public notice and a clipping of the same to the Clerk of the Court for inclusion in your docket file.
Show up in court. You do not have to appear dressed or be represented by an attorney. It is helpful to have a letter from your psychologist or a doctor explaining the reason you are making your name change.

The Judge will order the Clerk to issue the official declaration of your new name.

Copies can then be taken to the Department of Motor Vehicles, Social Security Office, Insurance and bank managers to have your name properly recorded on all documents.

A new driver’s license and social security card will be issued.

To change your gender:

Bring a surgeon’s letter to the Clerk of the District Court and file a motion to have your gender changed. This has not been done very often in Wyoming so most of the Clerks will simply schedule the appearance before the District Court. No notice needs to be filed in the newspaper but the same sixty-dollar fee will be paid to secure your docket number.

When the Judge orders the official gender change, take copies to the Department of Transportation, Social Security, Birth Registration Office, etc., and get all these documents changed.

If you are having surgery performed outside of the United States: Take your passport with your proper name and present gender and a letter from your surgeon to the Consulate office in that country. They will issue a new or amended passport on the spot. You should have no difficulties returning to the US even after the changes mandated by the Patriot Act.

This information comes from Senator Craig Thomas’ office in Rock Springs, Wyoming.

Other resources

 

Wyoming law

Precedent for transsexuals

[no specific case noted]